Saturday, April 26, 2008

Dog Decades

Racine has bitten the hand that feeds it. It hasn't let go for fourty years. The majority think the answer is to sink the teeth still deeper. The dog that is Racine is hungry and angry and doesn't know why.

7 comments:

Pariah Jeep said...

I don't think it is the majority, I think it is the most vocal and agenda-ized. It is the majority that pays though, and once that big dog gets fed the owners will be letting it crap in your yards.

Anonymous said...

Must be some right wing insider commentary.

I don't even want to know what you are talking about...

Pariah Jeep said...

Good! Then get back to your box of tissues and barelylegal.com. Or is that the ShopKo underwear photos?

Denis Navratil said...

anon, I tried to explain this post to my dog but he didn't understand either. You see, the dog understands hunger but is unable to understand that biting the hand that feeds him has led to the hunger. Likewise, liberals may well understand poverty, but they don't understand that they have caused it by biting the hand of, ie heavily taxing, wealth producers. If you don't understand this post anon, it is because you are like the dog. You understand the hunger but you don't know the cause.

Anonymous said...

Navratil, you are an a #1 jerk.

Are you God now?

Anonymous said...

Naratil, I have forgotten more about economics than you know...you belief superstition and prejudice.

Anonymous said...

Here is Pope John Paul II on the matter. Notice 'Universal destination of goods".:

Pope John Paul II used the same words in Sollicitudo and various other speeches and writings that Peter Maurin so often quoted, from the earliest tradition of the Church regarding private property: The universal destination of goods means that private property is for everybody, not just for those who use it to make their fortune.

“It is necessary to state once more the characteristic principle of Christian social doctrine: the goods of this world are originally meant for all. The right to private property is valid and necessary, but it does not nullify the value of this principle. Private property, in fact, is under a "social mortgage," which means that it has an intrinsically social function, based upon and justified precisely by the principle of the universal destination of goods .” (42)

The “social mortgage” the Pope spoke of, as Peter Maurin often said, means that whatever property you have is held in trust for the common good.

These teachings of John Paul II undermine those who encourage cutthroat businesses practices that hurt “the Lord's poor,” (so often couched in a revision of Adam Smith's language) to be ameliorated by philanthropy in one's later life—especially philanthropy that only encourages others to do the same.